Violin Bows

This is a list of all the violin bows for sale on the website, including contemporary and antique violin bows – chosen for all-round playing ability and tone.

Here are links to violin bows under £2,500, violin bows £2,500 to £5,000 and violin bows over £5,000

New Violin Bows by A. Reis

Two in stock More details


Jack Horsfall Violin Bow, circa 1980

Recently sold

Jack Horsfall Violin Bow, circa 1980
This is a good English bow by Jack Horsfall, bought directly from him by the current owner. Horsfall was one of a number of semi-professional makers who studied with Retford, and the influence shows in his work. The stick is of octagonal red-brown pernambuco with a slight figure, the frog is plain ebony with silver mounts, the pin is plain silver with a pearl eye. More details


Penzel Violin Bow, Erlbach circa 1970

Recently sold

Penzel Violin Bow, Erlbach circa 1970The Penzel family have been making bows for over 100 years – this is one of their workshop productions, relatively unassuming in appearance but a great playing bow. The stick is of octagonal section red pernambuco, mounts are silver and ebony. All parts are original and the condition is excellent – the lapping and thumb leather are original, and the bow has had little use. More details


Pillot Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1920

£1,350

Pillot Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1920
This is a relatively modest Mirecourt bow stamped Pillot which plays superbly. The stick is of deep red pernambuco, mounts are ebony and nickel. The condition is excellent throughout, with the exception of the ebony collar of the adjuster which has two small cracks. More details


Kurt Dölling Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1960

Recently sold, £1,700

Kurt Dölling Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1960
This is a classic Markneukirchen bow from a well-respected maker, typically strong, positive and reliable. The stick is of octagonal mid-brown pernambuco, mounts are silver and ebony. All parts are original and the condition is excellent apart from a minor scratch on the audience side of the head. More details


Cuniot-Hury Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1920

£1,700

Cuniot-Hury Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1920This is a very good Cuniot-Hury made by Emile F. Ouchard, who apprenticed with Eugene Cuniot-Hury and then took over the workshop in 1912. The model is characterized by a tall narrow head and a frog with a rounded heel – the plain adjuster of slightly greater diameter than the stick is also typical. The output of this workshop is vary varied in quality, but this is a lovely example, finely worked and with good wood. More details


Roger Francois Lotte Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1950 (later mounts)

£2,500

Roger Francois Lotte Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1950This is a classic Mirecourt bow made by Roger Francois Lotte, branded Georges Coné & Fils Lyon. Lotte supplied a lot of unbranded bows like this to French violin-makers such as Coné. The mounts are not typical of Lotte – although they are a perfect fit and of fine quality, it seems wise to assume they aren’t original. The stick is of round section red pernambuco – the wire lapping appears original and everything is in excellent condition. More details


Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow for Chanot, circa 1920

£2,500

Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow for Chanot, circa 1920

This is a lovely Markneukirchen bow made for the London firm of Chanot by the Nürnberger workshop. The head and the pinning of the underslide are identical to this authentically branded Nürnberger. The stick is of round section mid-brown pernambuco, mounts are of silver and ebony. The condition is excellent. More details


Cousenon Bernardel Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1930

£2,750

Cousenon Bernardel Violin Bow,  Mirecourt circa 1930
This is a very good silver-mounted Mirecourt bow stamped Leon Bernardel Paris. This brand was owned by the Cousenon firm, but most likely the bow was supplied by the Laberte workshops. Typical French features include the cuts to the corners of the ferrule and the visible transition from octagonal to round section beyond the end of the lapping. More details


WE Hill & Sons Violin Bow circa 1940

£3,500

WE Hill & Sons Violin Bow circa 1940
This a lovely Hill bow by Arthur Copley, silver mounted, and with its original whalebone lapping. Although it bears the WE Hill & Son stamp reserved for their best bows, it’s a bit tatty here and there, hence the bargain price. There are no significant condition issues, but the frog is chipped and has a repaired crack, the stick’s a bit nibbled here and there, and the silver face plate is slightly dented. More details


Otto Hoyer Pariser Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1930

Recently sold, £3,750

Otto Hoyer Pariser Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1930This is an unusually fine Otto Hoyer bow, both in looks and in its playing qualities. Otto Hoyer (1889-1966) was the most technically accomplished maker of this big family. He claimed to have worked for Sartory, and gave himself the nickname of “Pariser” implying that his work was rather more French than German. Maybe he was a bit conceited, but this is genuinely one of the best 20th century German bows I’ve come across. More details


Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, circa 1930

Recently sold

Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, circa 1930
This is a classic mid- 20th century Nürnberger bow, probably the work of Carl Albert Nürnberger. The stick is of round section red-brown pernambuco, mounts are silver and ebony with faux whalebone lapping. The condition is generally very tidy, with just a small chip to the audience side of the frog. More details


James Dodd Violin Bow, London circa 1850

£4,500

James Dodd Violin Bow, London circa 1850
This is a fine violin bow by James Dodd from the middle of the 19th century. It’s very typical – great pernambuco, octagonal section stick with a large sculptural head sweeping upwards, slightly tilted frog with no backplate etc. The bow is silver-mounted, and the head has its original silver face. More details


Michael J Taylor Violin Bow for Ealing Strings, London circa 1989

£4,750

Michael J Taylor Violin Bow for Ealing Strings, London circa 1989I’m a big fan of Michael Taylor’s bows – I always like them, but this one is exceptional. It bears the serial number 1712 under the frog, and according to Michael this dates it to around 1989. It’s something of a luxury bow, with superbly flamed pernambuco in octagonal section and gold/tortoiseshell mounts. The condition is near perfect, with one very careful owner who bought it new from Ealing Strings. More details


Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, circa 1920

£4,750

Albert Nürnberger circa 1920
This is a fine Nürnberger violin bow from the 1920s with beautiful silverwork and a delicate Viorin model head. It’s in excellent condition apart from some minor wear to the handle – the stick is of lightly figured orange-brown octagonal section pernambuco. Nürnbergers are in my view the most dependable playing bows around, and if they weren’t German they would be pricier than Sartorys. This example has the typical warm and cushioned feel – imperturbable on the string, sprightly and clean off the string, with the balance point slightly towards the heel. More details


Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1890

£5,000

Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1890This is a very nice lightweight Albert Nürnberger from around 1890. Although it carries an 1878 brand, Klaus Grünke tells me that this doesn’t relate to the year of manufacture. It also bears a Wurlitzer brand, indicating that it was made for or sold by Wurlitzer in New York. The stick is of round section lightly flamed chocolate brown pernambuco, with a distinctly French transition from octagonal to round; the frog is silver-mounted. All parts are original and the condition is excellent More details


WE Hill & Sons Violin Bow circa 1920

Recently sold

WE Hill & Sons Violin Bow circa 1920
This a superb gold mounted Hill bow, probably made by workshop manager William Napier. It’s an exceptional example, beautifully made, and using outstanding dense and highly figured pernambuco. There’s a repaired grain lift to the top of the handle directly above the pearl eye, hence the bargain price, otherwise the condition is excellent – the lapping is the original whalebone. More details


Franz Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, Markneukirchen c 1910

£6,000

Franz Albert Nürnberger Violin Bow, Markneukirchen circa 1910This is a very fine early 20th century Tourte model Nürnberger bow, bearing a “Saxony” brand on the underside of the stick behind the frog. The stick is of octagonal section red-brown pernambuco, mounts are silver and ebony. The condition is exceptional, with no issues to report. More details


Louis Bazin Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1930

On trial, £6,000

Louis Bazin Violin Bow,  Mirecourt circa  1930The Bazin family were one of the most important dynasties in French bow-making. Although their workshop output was massive (and massively inconsistent), the best work from Charles Nicholas Bazin and Louis Bazin is right up there. Many regard Louis as the best maker in the family, and this particular bow is a splendid example. More details


Auguste Barbé Violin Bow for Gand & Bernardel, Paris circa 1890

£8,000

Auguste Barbé Violin Bow for Gand & Bernardel, Paris circa 1890Auguste Barbé is a highly respected maker who worked exclusively for Gand & Bernardel, and whose bows are regarded as equal to those of FN Voirin. Gand & Bernardel employed some of the great names in French bow-making (Joseph Henry and Pierre Simon perhaps the most famous), and their output was of the highest quality. This bow is typical of their later period, branded simply Gand & Bernardel rather than Gand & Bernardel Fres indicating a post-1885 date. The stick is of excellent orange-brown pernambuco, the frog is ebony with silver mounts. The head is exquisitely worked and vey artistic. More details


James Tubbs Violin Bow, London circa 1910

Recently sold

James Tubbs Violin Bow, London circa 1910We currently have 3 good James Tubbs violin bows on the website – perhaps that gives a clue as to how I rate him as a maker! His model is individual and very distinctive with long buttons, long rounded ferrules, the head broad and elegant, always with a silver face. This example from Tubbs’ later period is in superb condition – excellent mid-brown pernambuco of round section with lovely figure, silver and ebony mounts, the plain ebony frog with its square heel characteristic of the period. More details


James Tubbs Violin Bow, London circa 1890

On trial, £12,000

James Tubbs Violin Bow,  London circa 1890

I have to admit that I’ve woken up rather belatedly to the qualities of a fine Tubbs. The wood in his bows is very variable, and some seem just too soft or light to be useful. But the bows he made with strong and dense wood like this one are amazing. His model is individual and very distinctive with long buttons, long rounded ferrules, the head broad and elegant, always with a silver face. More details


FN Voirin Violin Bow, Paris circa 1860 (mounts not original)

£12,000

FN Voirin Violin Bow, Paris circa 1860For most players who have had the use of a good Voirin, there’s no turning back. He is without doubt the greatest maker of the later 19th century, and the model he developed became the definitive model, copied and re-interpreted by pretty much every bowmaker since. Like so many of the greats, Voirin spent time in the Vuillaume shop, and this is one of the bows he made there (stamped JB Vuillaume). It follows the bold pattern of Pierre Simon, but with some nebulous extra refinement or elegance. The stick is of dark chocolate pernambuco with a lovely wild flame – the mounts are of the period but not original to the stick. More details


Victor Fétique Violin Bow, Paris circa 1920

£13,500

Victor Fétique Violin Bow, Paris circa 1920Victor Fétique was an extremely productive maker – the first half of his working life was spent in the employ of CN Bazin and Caressa & Francais, subsequently he ran a busy workshop in his own name, and in 1925 received the honour of “Premier Archetier de France”. Fétique stamped bows are a bit of a nightmare, since his workshop bought in and finished some sticks from Markenukirchen, and the German makers in turn faked his brand. Fétique also made a large number of unbranded bows for other dealers or violin-makers. The only way through this morass is to entrust the identification to an expert, and in this case JF Raffin has confirmed that the bow is entirely the work of Victor Fétique, though sold by and branded Paul Jombar Paris. More details


JA Vigneron (Père) Violin Bow, Paris circa 1900

£16,500

JA Vigneron (Père) Violin Bow, Paris circa 1900Joseph-Arthur Vigneron is another of the great names in French bow-making. Like so many of the better late 19th century makers he worked for Gand & Bernardel before setting up on his own. He developed his own very successful model, rather more masculine than Voirin or Lamy, balanced a bit more to the heel, and with very exaggerated chamfers to the head. This is a typical example of his work – it was the much-loved first bow of a retired professional. More details


Joseph Alfred Lamy (Père) Violin Bow, Paris circa 1895

£18,000

Joseph Alfred Lamy (Père) Violin Bow, Paris circa 1895This is a very fine Joseph Alfred Lamy in excellent condition, stamped A Lamy à Paris. Lamy worked for FN Voirin until the latter’s death in 1885, then set up on his own producing bows of superb quality. This bow dates from Lamy’s earlier period – the plain eye set far back in the frog is typical of his work at this time. But unlike some bows from this period, this example has a strong stick and a perfect weight. Very much the ideal Lamy, it has a great sound, great technical quality and optimal antique value. More details


Eugène Sartory Violin Bow, Paris circa 1910

Eugène Sartory Violin Bow, Paris circa 1910Eugène Sartory is without question the most highly respected bowmaker of the 20th century, and this is in all respects a perfect example of his work. It’s in pristine condition, with its original lapping and ivory face, and it’s an ideal weight at 62 grams. Much has been written about Sartory’s genius, but essentially you could reduce this down to two observations – his work is outstandingly precise, and his understanding of the needs of modern players has not been surpassed. More details


Pierre Simon Violin Bow, Paris circa 1850

Pierre Simon Violin Bow, Paris circa 1850I suppose that most people’s list of “French bows to die for” would read Dominique Peccatte, Joseph Henry, Pierre Simon, FN Voirin in that order. There are more beautifully made bows, there are more historic bows, but these four makers have stood the test of time when it comes to their reputation amongst great players. Both Peccatte, Simon and Voirin all worked for JB Vuillaume, and this bow is a Simon from the Vuillaume shop, circa 1850-60. The characteristic frog design and fitting was used by all of the 20 or so Vuillaume makers, but the heads give away the identity of the maker, and Simon is very distinctive with such a backwards curve to the rear of the head. The stick is of round section dark chocolate brown pernambuco, mounts are of silver and ebony, with the typical catfish-mouth ferrule and elegantly curved backplate. More details


Joseph René Lafleur Violin Bow, Paris circa 1830

Joseph René Lafleur Violin Bow, Paris circa 1830Lafleur is one of the great names in French bow-making. Perhaps the most interesting thing about Joseph Lafleur is that the modern bow came of age during his lifetime – there’s a marked change in style throughout his working life, and this later example is a modern bow in all respects. Contemporary bow-makers would kill or maim to get their hands on this quality of pernambuco, dense, veined and beautifully flamed. The head is very artistic, a bell-like model which Pierre Simon championed in his work. Typical frog with 2-piece heel-plate, one single pin in the centre of the back plate. More details


Violin Bows For Sale Under £2,500

Violin Bows £2,500 to £5,000

Fine Violin Bows Over £5,000


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