Michael Albani Violin, Bolzano circa 1720

Michael Albani Violin, Bolzano circa 1720

The Albani family played a huge role in the development of violin-making, and yet their instruments are rarely seen. This violin is a very interesting example, following very closely on the work of Matthias but made by his son Michael. Always more successful tonally than Stainer (the other Tyrolean), this violin is no exception.
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Etienne Pajeot Cello Bow, Mirecourt circa 1830

Etienne Pajeot Cello Bow, Mirecourt circa 1830

Etienne Pajeot is one of the great early French makers, and his bows are highly sought after for their excellent technical qualities. This is a relatively rare early cello bow in good condition.

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Charles Maucotel Violin, London 1851

Charles Maucotel Violin, London 1851

Charles Maucotel was the first of the Parisian makers to come to London. A tremendous yet relatively unknown maker, here we have a beautiful del Gesu copy of his in excellent condition, and with a first class sound.
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Dominique Peccatte Violin Bow, Paris circa 1840

Dominique Peccatte Violin Bow, Paris circa 1840

Dominique Peccatte occupies a unique place in the history of bow-making. While Tourte commands the highest prices, Peccatte brought the bow to a state of modernity which remains the archetype to this day. This is an unusually fine and rare example with an open frog and wood-to-wood mounts, but currently sporting a gold copy frog and button.
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WE Hill & Son Violin Bow, London circa 1935

WE Hill & Son Violin Bow, London circa 1935

There are few professional players who don’t have a Hill in their case. The firm’s reputation for quality and reliability is well deserved, and the bows carrying the WE Hill & Sons brand are always in demand.
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Louis Morizot Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1925

Louis Morizot Violin Bow, Mirecourt circa 1925

Louis Morizot’s main claim to fame is his association with Sartory, yet he’s a great maker in his own right. Under his sons, the family name became rather associated with mass production and clunky student bows, but at the time this bow was made, a Morizot was a thing of great refinement and beauty.
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Jan Kulik Violin, Prague circa 1850

Jan Kulik Violin, Prague circa 1850

Jan Kulik is perhaps the most refined maker of the Prague school. His violins are very individual, artistic and yet precise. This is a fine example with a superb sound, loosely based on a Gragnani and carrying a Gragnani label.
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Joseph Calot Violin, Paris circa 1815

Joseph Calot Violin, Paris circa 1815

Joseph Calot is a fascinating figure in the history of violin-making. He is best known as a Turin maker for his association/collaboration with Pressenda, but he was also an apprentice in the workshop of Nicholas Lupot, and our violin is a bold variation on Lupot’s Paris style. This is a perfectly preserved example of Calot’s Parisian work, showing exceptional ability.
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Nicholas Leonard Tourte Violin Bow, Paris circa 1805

Nicholas Leonard Tourte Violin Bow, Paris circa 1805

Tourte is without question the most prestigious name in the history of bow-making. While FX Tourte was largely responsible for the design of bow that we recognize today, his older brother NL or “Tourte l’Ainé” was equally revolutionary.
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Alfred Acoulon Violin, Mirecourt circa 1910

Alfred Acoulon Violin, Mirecourt circa 1910

Alfred Acoulon was the foremost luthier employed by the Jerome Thibouville Lamy workshops, and he produced their flagship instruments under the soubriquet “Lutherie Parisienne”. Violins sold under his label were made entirely by him – in 1912 an Alfred Acoulon cost 20 times the price of a Geronimo Barnabetti.
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MSV Hardanger Fiddle (standard model)

Hardanger fiddle/ Hardanger violin Our Hardanger fiddle is a simplified version of a traditional Hardanger, made with a violin scroll and without ornamentation. The body is copied directly from an award-winning instrument by Sveinung Gyovland. This historic instrument had excellent tone and sustain, so we followed the outline, arching and thicknesses faithfully. The result is an affordable Hardanger with a completely authentic sound.
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Georges Chanot (II) Violin, London 1861

The Chanot family have been hugely influential in the history of violin-making, both in France and in England. Georges Chanot II was sent to England by his father in order to stop him misbehaving in Paris – it definitely worked, and he became a consummate and very successful maker.
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Mario Gadda Violin, Mantua 1979

Mario Gadda Violin, Mantua 1979

Mario Gadda is one of the best-known names in modern Italian violin-making, and this violin is a great sounding example of his own model in excellent condition.
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Hippolyte Silvestre Violin, Lyon 1862

Hippolyte Silvestre Violin, Lyon 1862

Pierre and Hippolyte Silvestre were exceptional makers, and their success owes much to their training with Nicolas Lupot and JB Vuillaume respectively. The two brothers worked together from 1829 until 1848, and then worked independently – Hippolyte survived his brother by 20 years and produced the greater number of instruments, but both makers are accorded equal status within the trade. This Guarneri model violin is a superb example of Hippolyte’s later work, and it’s in great condition.
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Nicolas Maline Violin Bow, Paris circa 1865

Nicolas Maline Violin Bow, Paris circa 1865

Nicolas Maline, also known confusingly as Guillaume Maline, is quite a maverick figure from the Golden period of French bow-making. Even his dates are disputed, as is the question of whether or not he worked for Vuillaume. However, his work is unique and distinctive, and of the highest quality.
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